Economics Course Selection

Is it possible for students to waive Microeconomics for Policy I (PPPA 6007)?
Yes. PPPA 6007 is the first required course in economics. It is a course in intermediate microeconomic theory that is at a similar level as courses offered in undergraduate economics curricula as a second level course in microeconomic theory. If you have adequate economics coursework at either the undergraduate or graduate level, you can waive this course and enroll directly into PPPA 6014 (Microeconomics for Public Policy II).

Who is able to waive Microeconomics for Policy I (6007)?
If you were: (1) an economics major or minor, or (2) were in another field that included several economics courses at the intermediate level or higher, you do not need to take the first microeconomics course and can go directly into PPPA 6014 (Microeconomic for Policy II).

Who should not waive Microeconomics for Policy II (6014)?
If you have had: (1) no previous economics, or (2) if you have taken only a Principles of Economics course, or (3) if you do not remember the economics that you took, then you should register for PPPA 6007 (Microeconomics for Policy I).

What microeconomics knowledge does Microeconomics for Policy II (PPPA 6014) assume?
Microeconomics for Policy II (PPPA 6014) assumes a working knowledge of intermediate microeconomic theory.  In the normal undergraduate economics curriculum, intermediate microeconomic theory is taken after a principles course.  If you have taken intermediate microeconomic theory but are unsure of whether you have a working knowledge, you should register for Microeconomics for Policy II (PPPA 6014), take the “initial assessment” online test and begin working on problem set 1.  If you do poorly on the initial assessment or find problem set 1 extremely difficult, then you should switch to Microeconomics for Policy I (PPPA 6007).

What kind of math do I need to know to be prepared for Microeconomics for Policy I (PPPA 6007)? and/or What kind of math do I need to know to be prepared for Microeconomics for Policy II (PPPA 6014)?
You need the math skills requited for Microeconomics for Policy I (PPPA 6007) and also a basic knowledge of exponential and logarithmic functions.  It is important to know basic algebra and graphing well but it is OK to use reference materials for things such as the rules of logarithms so long as you know how to use the reference materials.

What is the process for seeking a waiver to register for Microeconomics for Policy II (PPPA 6014) without taking Microeconomics for Policy I (PPPA 6007)?
There is no official form or process you need to follow.  If you have adequate economics background (see first paragraph above), you should register for Microeconomics for Policy II (PPPA 6014) and not for Microeconomics for Policy I (PPPA 6007).  Students who skip Microeconomics for Policy I (PPPA 6007) will be granted a waiver during the first semester. If this is not reflected in DegreeMap by the end of the first semester, please notify the MPP Program Director.

How does going directly into Microeconomics for Policy II (PPPA 6014) without taking Microeconomics for Policy I (PPPA 6007) affect my choice of other courses?
If you are granted a waiver (see question about waiver below ADD LINK TO THIS) from taking Microeconomics for Policy I (PPPA 6007), you still need to enroll in 40 credits to complete the degree. However, you will be able to take an additional field course in place of 6007.

What if I enroll in Microeconomics for Policy I (PPPA 6007) and realize I should be in Microeconomics for Policy II (PPPA 6014)?
In the first two weeks of the semester, you can switch from one course to the other as long as there are seats in Microeconomics for Policy II (PPPA 6014).  However, PPPA 6014 moves rapidly and you should make your decision as quickly as possible, normally by the end of the first week of classes.  The initial decision about which course to take is not a final one; you can go to both courses the first week and switch as needed.

What if I enroll in Microeconomics for Policy II and realize I should be in Microeconomics for Policy I (PPPA 6007)?
In the first two weeks of the semester, you can switch from one course to the other, as long as there are seats in Microeconomics for Policy I (PPPA 6007).  The initial decision about which course to take is not a final one; you can go to both courses the first week and switch as needed.

When should I take Microeconomics for Policy I (PPPA 6007)?
If possible, full time students who need Microeconomics for Policy I (PPPA 6007) should take it in their first semester.  Part-time students should take PPPA 6007 in either their first or second semester.
MPP students who wish to take Benefit-Cost analysis will need to have already taken both semesters of Microeconomics for Policy. So a full-time student would need to take PPPA 6007 by the end of their second semester to have time to complete the three semester sequence of PPPA 6007, PPPA 6014, and PPPA 6015.

What semesters is Microeconomics for Policy I (PPPA 6007) usually offered?
Usually the fall semester has an afternoon and an evening section; the spring has only an evening section.

When should I take Microeconomics for Policy II (PPPA 6014)?
You should take it as soon as feasible after you have satisfied the prerequisite.  Full time students who do not need to take Microeconomics for Policy I (PPPA 6007) should take Microeconomics for Policy II (PPPA 6014) in their first semester.

What semesters is Microeconomics for Policy II (PPPA 6014) usually offered?
PPPA 6014 is normally offered in the fall and spring semesters but not in the summer.