About the Arthur S. Flemming Awards

For the past sixty-four years, the Arthur S. Flemming Awards have recognized outstanding men and women in the federal government. The awards were established in 1948 in honor of Arthur Flemming’s commitment to public service throughout his distinguished career, which spanned seven decades and 11 presidencies. Recognized by the President of the United States, agency heads, and the private sector, the winners are selected from all areas of the federal service.

The purpose of the Arthur S. Flemming Award is fourfold:

  1. to recognize outstanding and meritorious achievement in working for the federal government;
  2. to encourage the highest standards of performance in the federal service;
  3. to enhance appreciation of our form of government and the opportunities and responsibilities that it presents; and
  4. to attract outstanding individuals to a career in federal service.

The George Washington University and the Arthur S. Flemming Awards Commission present a total of twelve awards annually in five categories:

  • Leadership and/or Management
  • Legal Achievement
  • Social Science, Clinical Trials and Translational Research
  • Applied Science and Engineering
  • Basic Science

About the Trachtenberg School of Public Policy and Public Administration

President George Washington envisioned a school in the capital to educate the nation’s citizens to lead a thriving society, and that is just what the Trachtenberg School of Public Policy and Public Administration strives to do.

The Trachtenberg School of Public Policy & Public Administration consistently ranks highly among public affairs schools. In the 2013 US News & World Report grad school rankings, the Trachtenberg School ranked as the #12 Public Affairs school.

Faculty of the Trachtenberg School are top scholars in their fields who complete research and help answer the important policy and governance questions of the day.  Classes are taught by experts who have both a theoretical background and practical hands-on experience in public service. Students are challenged to think through timely questions facing public servants by faculty who are in the heart of the process –as consultants, researchers and practitioners.